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KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE BALL – SPORTS EYE SAFETY

POSTED ON April 9th, 2014  - POSTED IN Eye Safety, Rand Eye Institute

36408273Always take precautions, especially with young children, when it comes to sports eye safety: wear helmets with built-in eye shields while playing little league ball.

Impacts from other objects like tennis balls, racquet or squash balls, or even hand balls can be equally devastating. High-speed projectiles like paint balls or hockey pucks are very dangerous.  Participants in any of these sports should take proper precautions to prevent fast moving objects from hitting them in the eye. They shouldn’t rely on “fast reflexes” to keep them safe! Sports goggles can be sight saving and have become more fashionable, available, and affordable.

Any participant in recreational or professional sports who suffers an eye injury, who has an eye disease, or who has had eye surgery should discuss with their eye doctor when they can safely return to their sport and what precautions they should take. A common sense approach to the real eye risks inherent in sports activities can make participants safer and minimize the chances of losing their precious eyesight.

By:

Robert S. Nagler, M.D.

Comprehensive Ophthalmology, Refractive & Cataract Surgery

Basketball Eye Safety Tips

POSTED ON April 8th, 2014  - POSTED IN Eye Safety, Rand Eye Institute

24234980There are other sports that pose dangers to the eye. Basketball players are very susceptible to getting poked in the eye. Anything from a mere corneal abrasion to a more vision threatening injury can occur. Also, a flailing elbow can cause a fracture to the eye socket. Unfortunately, many basketball players only wear eye protection after sustaining a significant eye injury. Sports goggles can be sight saving and have become more fashionable, available, and affordable.

Any participant in recreational or professional sports who suffers an eye injury, who has an eye disease, or who has had eye surgery should discuss with their eye doctor when they can safely return to their sport and what precautions they should take. A common sense approach to the real eye risks inherent in sports activities can make participants safer and minimize the chances of losing their precious eyesight.

By:

Robert S. Nagler, M.D.
Comprehensive Ophthalmology, Refractive & Cataract Surgery

 

Sports Eye Safety Awareness Month

POSTED ON April 1st, 2014  - POSTED IN Eye Safety, Eye Wellness, Rand Eye Institute

Dr-Nagler

Robert S. Nagler, M.D.
Comprehensive Ophthalmology, Refractive & Cataract Surgery
April is National Sports Eye Safety Month. Eye injuries suffered while participating in recreational sports are a leading cause of eye related visits to emergency rooms. Permanent significant visual loss can occur from these injuries. Two years ago, I treated a prominent Minor League baseball player who was hit in the eye with a tossed baseball. He suffered serious bleeding in the eye, and swelling of the retina. Thankfully, he recovered nicely and resumed his successful career, hopefully on his way to the Major Leagues. If the injury had been any worse, it could have ended his career. Most people understand that a high speed impact to the eye from a hard object like a baseball could cause serious damage.

Any participant in recreational sports who suffers an eye injury, who has an eye disease, or who has had eye surgery should discuss with their eye doctor when they can safely return to their sport and what precautions they should take. A common sense approach to the real eye risks inherent in sports activities can make participants safer and minimize the chances of losing their precious eyesight.

Dr. Oz and Lisa Oz – Health and Wellness Fair this Saturday

POSTED ON March 28th, 2014  - POSTED IN Events, Rand Eye Institute

Dr. Oz and Lisa Oz will be at the West Palm Beach Health and Wellness Fair this Saturday March 29th from 10AM – 4 PM.

Dr. Mehmet Oz will be presenting “How to Live the Good Life” discussing topics such as health, personal growth and happiness.

Viewer Questions will be personally answered by Dr. Oz.

Visit the Rand Eye booth at the Health and Wellness Fair in West Palm Beach.

OFFICIAL WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival 2014

 

Saturday, March 29th

10AM – 4PM

WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival 2014

Location: The Gardens Mall

3101 PGA Boulevard

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

 

It’s time to get serious about your health, South Florida! Dr. Oz is coming back to see you personally! WPBF 25′s Health & Wellness Festival 2014 is bigger and better than last year, as America’s Doctor brings the excitement of The Dr. Oz Show to the Gardens Mall! Just announced: Lisa Oz, best-selling author, show host and editor-at-large of Dr. Oz’s new magazine The Good Life, joins her husband on stage!

 

Do Not Put Your Eyes at Risk

POSTED ON March 27th, 2014  - POSTED IN Eye Safety, Rand Eye Institute

Don’t put your eyes, something so highly valued at risk when wearing protective goggles or glasses is so simple, they can make a difference.   

Prevent Blindness America states that each year more than 700,000 Americans injure their eyes at work. Another 125,000 Americans injure their eyes at home.  Another 40,000 American children and adults suffer eye injuries during sports, while many more eye injuries go unreported. Experts say that using the proper safety goggles or glasses could prevent around 90% of all eye injuries. Depending on your lifestyle or work situation your safety goggles or glasses could vary.

 

Do you know the difference between safety goggles/glasses and regular eyeglasses?

Protective eyewear has to meet a higher standard for impact protection than normal eyewear.  Protective or “safety” glasses can have prescription lenses or normal non-prescription (aka plano) lenses. Regardless of size or durability of the frame and lenses, regular everyday eyewear does not qualify as safety or protective eyewear, unless a specific criteria is meet (aka the higher standard).  The higher standard is more commonly known as the safety guidelines for the workplace, which is established by the United States federal government. The goal of the government is to decrease the risk of injuries on the job.  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) acts within the U.S. Department of Labor and oversees safety practices in the workplace and in educational settings.

Which Safety Goggles or Glasses are Best for Home Use?

POSTED ON March 27th, 2014  - POSTED IN Eye Safety, Rand Eye Institute

For those who are independent contractors or even if you are working on your own home, one should choose the frame and the lenses that received the highest rating for high impact to be extra safe while on the job. The high impact lenses can be bought at most hardware, building supply and sporting good stores.

Most safety glasses are made of a very might polycarbonate, which is designed that way for comfort and come in attractive wrap-style frames. Styles that have the highest impact rating will have “Z87” on them.

If you need safety glasses and require prescription lenses you should consult an eye doctor or visit an optical store.

Safety Standards for Eyewear

POSTED ON March 26th, 2014  - POSTED IN Eye Safety, Rand Eye Institute

American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Safety standards for eyewear consists of the following features:

  • They go through basic impact tests where each lens is test on its own. For the higher impact class, the frame and lenses are together as one.
  • Non-prescription lenses are considered to be structurally weaker than prescription lenses when being used for high impact; this is do to the prescription lenses being thicker.
  • Safety lenses now have 2 classifications: basic and high impact
  • The “Drop Ball” test, which will prove whether the basic impact is passed or failed. This test consists of a steel ball, one-inch in diameter being dropped onto the lens from 50 inches high. In order to pass the test the lens must not crack, chip or break. All safety lenses must go through this test. When using plastic lenses, only a sample of a rather large batch must undergo testing, not every pair of lenses.
  • Another high impact test is one where a steel ball, a quarter inch in diameter is launched at the lens at a speed of 150 feet per second. In order to pass the lens must no chip, crack, break and cannot come undone or dislodge from the lens holder.

 

To determine if a safety goggle or glasses lens have passed the high speed test as described above, you will see a “+” marking, which confirms the lens success for high velocity impact.  You should also look for these markings, “V” and “S”. The “V” indicates that the lens is photochromic. The “S” indicates that the lens has a special tint. In some cases (depending on use or job) some glasses or goggles may require or come with a mild to moderate tint. For example a person or job that requires you to cut or weld might require a thicker lens and a stronger tint.

WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival 2014

POSTED ON March 25th, 2014  - POSTED IN Events, Rand Eye Institute

OFFICIAL WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival 2014

Visit the Rand Eye Institute this Weekend at the WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival 2014

Saturday, March 29th

10AM – 4PM

WPBF 25 Health & Wellness Festival 2014

Location: The Gardens Mall

3101 PGA Boulevard

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

 

It’s time to get serious about your health, South Florida! Dr. Oz is coming back to see you personally! WPBF 25′s Health & Wellness Festival 2014 is bigger and better than last year, as America’s Doctor brings the excitement of The Dr. Oz Show to the Gardens Mall! Just announced: Lisa Oz, best-selling author, show host and editor-at-large of Dr. Oz’s new magazine The Good Life, joins her husband on stage!

Come see and talk to the experts at the Garden Mall this Weekend from 10AM – 4PM.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

POSTED ON March 17th, 2014  - POSTED IN Events, Rand Eye Institute

stpatricks-blog-post

Happy St. Patrick’s Day Everyone!

 

How much do you know about St. Patrick’s Day?

 

  • Corned beef and cabbage is a traditional St. Patrick’s Day dish. In 2009, around 26.1 billion pounds of beef and 2.3 billion pounds of cabbage were produced in the U.S.
  • The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place in the U.S. on March 17, 1762. This occured when Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through New York City.
  • More than one-hundred St. Patrick’s Day parades are held across the U.S. New York City and Boston are home to the largest celebrations in the U.S.
  • At the annual New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade, participants march up 5th Avenue from 44th Street to 86th Street. Each year, between 150,000 – 250,000 marchers take part in the parade, however, automobiles or floats are not allowed.
  • There are 34.7 million U.S. residents with Irish ancestry and this number is more than seven times the population of Ireland itself.
  • Irish is the United States second most frequently reported ancestry, ranking behind German.
  • There are around 144,588 current U.S. residents who were born in Ireland.

Eye Injuries in the Workplace

POSTED ON March 13th, 2014  - POSTED IN Eye Safety, Rand Eye Institute

Any job in the U.S. workplace that has potential for airborne particles or noxious chemicals, employers are required to abide by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines. OSHA has guidelines about the workplaces and what type of eye wear and emergency eye care is to be used.

Experts say that over 90% of eye injuries in the workplace can be prevented by taking a few simple steps of precaution and wearing safety glasses. For example, if you use any form of power tool or yard trimming device, you should wear safety glasses. If you wear corrective lenses, hardware stores sell inexpensive goggles that will normally fit over your glasses. There are other more expensive types of glasses that you could also buy.

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