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Vitreo Retinal Department

Rand Eye Institute in Palm Beach / Ft. Lauderdale provides comprehensive treatment for retina diseases including diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and retinal detachment.

South Florida Vitreo-Retinal Surgery

Retinal Disease Treatment in Fort Lauderdale / Palm Beach

Rand Eye Institute’s Vitreo-Retinal Department offers comprehensive medical and surgical management for vitreo-retinal diseases with the most advanced technology. Close collaboration with the other Rand Eye Institute departments assures that our Palm Beach / Ft. Lauderdale retinal disease patients will receive timely and personalized retinal and ophthalmology services. It is important to understand that diseases of the retina can affect any and all ages. Initial symptoms should not be overlooked and an immediate consultation with a vitreo-retinal specialist in South Florida can make all the difference.

A perfect blend of clinical services, research, education and community service is provided by the vitreo-retinal department.

Some conditions and diseases that should be seen by a vitreo-retinal specialist include:

Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetes affects the circulatory system of the retina. In the earliest phases, the arteries in the retina become weakened and leak. There may be small, dot-like hemorrhages, and when the disease progresses, the swollen retina causes decreased vision. Poor circulation causes the retina to become oxygen-deprived (ischemic). Fragile new vessels grow in an attempt to maintain adequate oxygen levels within the retina. These delicate vessels bleed and leak into the retina and vitreous, causing blind spots and, later on, severe visual loss. Abnormal vessel growth and the development of scar tissue may cause serious problems such as retinal detachments or glaucoma.

Age-related macular degeneration

Detailed central vision is processed by the macula. If the macula becomes damaged, many daily activities such as driving and reading become increasingly difficult. Macular degeneration occurs most often in people over 60 years old, in which case it is called age related macular degeneration (ARMD). There are several hereditary forms of macular degeneration, which affect children or teen agers. Collectively, they are called juvenile macular degeneration.

Flashes and floaters

When the vitreous fluid (gel) inside the eye moves, the vitreous membrane may pull on the retina, causing a flashing sensation, although in fact there is no such light inside the eye. A similar sensation may happen if you hit or rub an eye and see “stars.” Flashes can appear once or several times. They may be associated with new floaters and even with partial loss of the visual field. Flashes and floaters may be associated with a retinal detachment. Sometimes a retinal tear gives no warning at all. If you experience any of these symptoms you cannot know if it is a vitreous condition or a retinal detachment, therefore, you should call your eye care physician as soon as possible.

Retinal detachment

Retinal detachments often develop in eyes with weakened retinas that have a retinal hole or tear. This allows fluid to seep underneath the retina so that the retina becomes detached – rather like wallpaper peeling off a damp wall. When detached, the retina cannot compose a clear picture and vision becomes blurred and dim.

Retinal arterial occlusions

A retinal artery occlusion occurs when the central retinal artery or one of the arteries that branch off of it becomes blocked. A tiny blood clot or small cholesterol plaque in the blood stream may be sufficient to cause the blockage of blood flow through the artery. This arterial occlusion can decrease the oxygen supply to the area of the retina nourished by the affected artery, causing permanent visual loss. Retinal artery obstructions are like a stroke in the eye. The damage can be relatively mild or quite severe, depending on the extent to which the blood flow has been disrupted.

Retinal vein occlusions

Retinal vein occlusions are caused by congestion of blood flowing out of the eye through the retinal veins. There is an increase in the back-pressure inside the veins. It can cause variable degrees of visual loss. It is most commonly seen in hypertensive and diabetic patients. Sometimes it can be seen in people with clotting abnormalities.

Macular Hole

A macular hole is a small break in the macula, the part of your eye responsible for detailed, central vision. Macular holes are associated with aging and usually occur in people over the age of 60. In the early stages of macular hole formation, symptoms may not be completely obvious. Your central vision becomes blurred and distorted. If the hole progresses, a blind spot develops in your central vision and impairs the ability to see at both distant and close range. Symptoms of macular hole usually occur in one eye only, as it is uncommon to have a macular hole in both eyes.

Epiretinal membrane-macular wrinkle

A macular wrinkle is a layer of scar tissue that grows on the surface of the retina, particularly the macula, which is the part of your eye responsible for detailed, central vision. With a macular pucker, you may notice that your central vision is blurry or mildly distorted, and straight lines can appear wavy. You may have difficulty seeing fine detail and reading small print. There may be a gray or cloudy area in the center of your vision, or perhaps even a blind spot.

 

Other disorders treated at our South Florida vitreo-retinal department:

 

  • Vitreous hemorrhage
  • Cystoid macular edema
  • Macular hole
  • Epiretinal membrane-macular wrinkle
  • Retinitis pigmentosa
  • Posterior uveitis
  • Ocular trauma
  • Intraocular tumors
  • Central serous retinopathy
  • Ocular toxoplasmosis
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Retinitis
  • Endophthalmitis-Inner eye infection

 

Common retinal symptoms

 

  • Sudden loss of vision
  • Sudden loss of visual field
  • Dimming of vision
  • Distorted or wavy lines in central vision
  • Central dark spot in front of the eye
  • Flashes of light
  • Black floaters in front of the eye
  • Distortion of letters on reading
  • Transient loss of vision
  • Failure to improve vision after cataract surgery
  • Difficulty reading
  • Seeing things smaller
  • Seeing things larger
  • Diminished vision in childhood
  • Night blindness
  • Day blindness
  • Photophobia
  • Constriction of visual fields
  • Trauma to the eye
  • Severe pain in the eye
  • White reflex in the eye

Rand Eye Institute’s Vitreo-Retinal Department offers comprehensive medical and surgical management for vitreo-retinal diseases with the most advanced technology. Close collaboration with the other Rand Eye Institute departments assures that patients will receive timely and personalized retinal as well as comprehensive ophthalmology services. It is important to understand that diseases of the retina can affect any and all ages. Initial symptoms should not be overlooked and an immediate consultation with a vitreo-retinal specialist can make all the difference.

 

 

danzigDr. Danzig

Carl Danzig, MD

Director of Vitreo-Retinal Services

Dr. Carl Danzig is a Ft. Lauderdale / Palm Beach vitreo-retinal specialist and board certified ophthalmologist dedicated to the medical and surgical care of patients with vitreo-retinal disorders.

Dr. Danzig is uniquely qualified. He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions and diseases affecting the vitreous, retina, and macula. His experience and extensive training complement the Rand Eye Institute’s all-encompassing care with his skill as a vitreo-retinal surgeon.

Dr. Danzig’s training includes a two-year fellowship focused solely on the diagnosis and treatment of vitreo-retinal diseases at the University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, TX, in addition to the completion of his ophthalmology residency at SUNY-Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, NY.

Prior to his residency training, Dr. Danzig completed a year of research in the Oncology Department at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, PA.

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