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Where There’s Smoke: The Eyes Have It

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We’ve cautioned over the years about the hazards of smoking, but in this article for Healthy Vision Month, here are the specifics as to why so many serious vision problems could be lessened or eliminated if we just put down the cigarettes, and that includes cigars and pipes.


Dry Eye is not directly related to smoking, but it’s easy to see how smoking can make your eyes feel scratchy, burn or turn red.

Cataracts are a clouding of the eye’s natural clear lens. Because smoke from cigarettes goes directly into the bloodstream, smokers are more at risk for getting cataracts.

AMD, or age related macular degeneration, is more likely to happen to someone who smokes than to someone who doesn’t. Currently there is NO cure for AMD.

Diabetic retinopathy can occur in smokers who already have diabetes.

Optic nerve problems can lead to blindness, and those who smoke are at increased risk of having optic nerve problems.

Uveitis affects the part of the eye called the uvea. Smoking can lead to uveitis.

Graves’ disease is a disease of the body’s thyroid gland. One symptom is bulging eyes. Smokers who have Graves’ disease run the risk of going blind.

Pregnant women who smoke run the risk of their child getting bacterial meningitis, known to cause vision problems. Premature birth is another symptom, which could result in “retinopathy of prematurity”, which could mean vision loss or blindness.

The simple truth: Quitting smoking can help save your vision, and during Healthy Vision Month, it’s more important than ever to know this information.

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Rand Eye Institute - Excellence in Ophthalmology. Having Earned a Reputation as one of the most advanced eye surgery centers in the world, Rand Eye Institute is dedicated to excellence in ophthalmology. Connect with Google+
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